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Leslie Frécon is managing partner and founder of LFE Capital. As a glass-ceiling-shattering pioneer, she founded the company in 2000 after having served as senior vice president of corporate finance at General Mills (GMI), where she was both the youngest and first female executive in the company’s history.

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Features

Growing up in the Highland Park area of St. Paul, Cindy Mori always knew what she wanted to be when she grew up. In junior high, Mori would watch the local morning news programs before school and fell in love with broadcast journalism. She followed her passion with a tremendous drive.

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Features

Remember their names: Amalia Nicholson, Leeya Jackson and Shareina Chandler. You’re going to be hearing a lot more from them. 

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A sick dog gave Ali Jarvis her classic entrepreneur’s flash: that moment when she needed a service that didn’t exist and figured that, if it was something she valued, other people would, as well.

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Franchise marketing is an earnest, if somewhat corny, trade. One franchise opportunity promises to “help you build a great life.” Another proclaims, “You’re a trailblazer.” Maybe those messages resonate with you. Or maybe you’re a franchise skeptic. At first, I was. 

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Necessity, as they say, is the mother of invention. For Paul Hines, it was actually his grandmother’s needs — specifically related to her difficulty in taking prescriptions — that spurred Hines’ idea for a smarter pillbox.

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Editor's Note

Calamity Jane (née Martha Jane Canary) once remarked, “I figure if a girl wants to be a legend, she should just go ahead and be one.” This issue is dedicated to all of the women — the true originals, the forward-thinkers and the up-and-comers — who just decided to go ahead and be legendary.

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Although it’s been two years since Patti Jensen was diagnosed, she clearly remembers the head-spinning panic she felt when her doctor told her she had cancer. As her treatment began, she couldn’t shake the fear that she was going to die. What helped her cope was a paintbrush and a blank canvas. 

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Negotiating compensation can be a daunting task, particularly for women. In a study of Carnegie Mellon University graduates, researcher Linda Babcock found that while 57% of men graduating with a masters degree said that they negotiated their salaries when offered a new position, only 7% of women graduating with a masters degree did the same. Those who did found the payoff worth the risk: The recent grads who negotiated received, on average, 7.4% more than their initial offers. 

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